1954 Ferrari 150 Sport

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1954 Ferrari 150 Sport

2.00
  • Engine: 200cc 2-stroke single cylinder
  • Transmission: 3 Speed Manual
  • Year: 1954
  • Frame #: S 2016 S
  • Engine #: S 2016 S
  • Registration: PS 18640
  • Mileage:
  • Exterior colour: Red
  • Interior colour and material: 

VIEWING BY APPOINTMENT ONLY PLEASE.

- The Automobile Club d'Italia Public Register ownership report that we have on file states that this Ferrari was manufactured on or around March 15th 1954 and first registered as PS-18640 in the province of Pesaro, on the east coast of Italy, on June 9th 1954. Sadly the handwriting on the document makes it difficult to determine the name of the first owner, but they are believed to be a Signore Tito Uliva.
- Interestingly, but not uncommon in our experience of Ferrari motorcycles, the engine capacity was recorded as being 200cc when it was registered.
- On December 24th 1958 ownership changed to an Emilio Uliva, perhaps a wonderful and generous Christmas present from Father to Son.
- In February 1960 ownership changed again.
- We were informed by the vendor when we purchased the motorcycle in Italy that it was restored in the late 2000's, and it is clear that it was done to an extremely high standard as the condition is superb.
- This is an uncommon opportunity to acquire an extremely rare small sporting Italian motorcycle in superb condition.  An excellent addition to any collection.

A brief history of Moto Fratelli Ferrari:

One of the most discussed topics circulating the visitors and journalists of the 1953 Motosalone di Milano (Milan Motorcycle Show) was that the racing car manufacturer Enzo Ferrari was branching out into motorcycle manufacture. The proof of this much doubted story though was to be found in one of the halls where a Ferrari red motorcycle could be seen (if you were successful in fighting your way through the crowds surrounding the stand). On proud display and bearing the car makers prancing horse crest and name was a 125cc single-cylinder two stroke machine with a two speed gearbox, bearing an uncanny resemblance to an offering from rival Parilla. As you can imagine, company staff were feverishly taking orders from excited visitors, who sadly were soon to become extremely disappointed and annoyed, as did a certain Enzo Ferrari. It was not long before news of what had happened within the Milan exhibition halls reached Maranello, as angry customers began contacting Enzo's company demanding to know why the motorcycle they had ordered had not been delivered. Aided by the frosty reception they received from Enzo Ferrari, it soon dawned on these people that they had not ordered a product of the car racing champions from Maranello, but an offering from a completely unrelated company from Milan that was run by a couple of adventurous brothers who decided to capitalise on the fact that they shared the same relatively common last name as the famous Enzo. One of the brothers had recently worked for Parilla, hence the similarity of the Ferrari motorcycle to his previous employers. The inevitable eventually happened and Enzo took the Ferrari brothers to court and sued them for miss-using his company name, and he won. The result was the Ferrari brothers could continue to use their name on their motorcycles but they must clearly state Fratelli Ferrari (Ferrari Brothers) and never use Enzos prancing horse logo again. Up until this time the motorcycles had simply worn the name FERRARI on the sides of the fuel tank and engine. The costs amounted by fighting Enzo soon took their toll on the small Fratelli Ferrari company and by the late 1950's the company no longer existed. During the company's short life it produced a small range of 125cc, 150cc and 250cc single and twin cylinder engined motorcycles. Survivors are extremely scarce with the majority believed to be the more popular and cheaper when new 125cc model. Due to their rarity, especially the early examples badged simply Ferrari prior to them being badged Fratelli Ferrari, very little is known about the company and its products.

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